Tour - Uganda

It may not be a commonly shared view by all Ugandans that of all the military and civil transitions that Uganda has witnessed, the recent move from movementism to multipartism can be dubbed as a relatively smooth transition. Much as we generally agree that there are many issues that need to be considered in understanding the causes of conflicts in Uganda and thus reconciliation initiatives, it would be naïve to argue that there is only one prescribed remedy for Uganda's problems. Ugandan society is not homogeneous and therefore no set interventions can just be applicable without taking cognizance of the underlying sources of conflict and key players. These, include among others family dislocations, community divisions along tribal and ethnic differences and national concoctions of political disharmony and developmental imbalances. Consequently, these issues have marred Uganda's complete transition to date. Hence, an integral and sustainable approach that incorporates all the possible interventions would need to be employed.

TRCs - An "obvious" redress mechanism? One should caution that Truth and Reconciliation Commissions (TRCs) as instruments of justice mechanisms are not always the prescribed solution towards ending past injustices. Most of Uganda's present challenges are part of and exacerbated by developmental deficits. It is possible to pin that to the conflicts and instabilities that were repercussions of past regime changes. Therefore, is TRC type intervention a plausible answer? Although many might tend to think in the affirmative, I would like to think that we need to think beyond the obvious rhetoric. Comparatively, the popular South African TRC had its own successes but it was not the only solution for the issues in the country. Its successes to date are yet to be or still measured against the implementation and effectiveness of various redress mechanisms undertaken by the incumbent government e.g. Black Economic Empowerment Initiatives, Affirmative Actions, Social and Economic Reforms etc. These were deliberate policies that the government undertook in efforts to address the past injustice against the black population in order for the country to move into a democratic dispensation. This is because national reconciliation is not a one-time event but a perennial process based on reflective consequences.

An Integrated and Sustainable Programme - how feasible? Certainly for the Ugandan situation, there is a need to look at a tailor-made solution that will be able to not only look into the past but one that will put more emphasis on the present and future contextual dispensations. That tailor-made solution should be in the form of an Integrated National Reconciliation Programme (INRP) which aims to consolidate and support initiatives that aim to take Uganda on a reconciliation path. The Programme being a Master Plan on National Reconciliation should adopt a developmental approach to Uganda's reconciliation and nation-building process. This programme should encompass a viable strategy that takes account of existing initiatives and particularly those that would harmonise disparities in policy formulations and implementations e.g. poverty eradication, skills based education, job creations, human rights, equal distribution of primary services and economic empowerment initiatives. There is a need for coherence and consistency in developing such a programme. This should be in such a way that every government strategic focus and implementation on reconciliation should be guided by the vision and objectives of the INRP which clearly stipulates past conflict fault-lines and their present and future redress mechanisms that is comprehensive and deliberate in affording every Ugandan a sense of ownership, security and belonging.

Peace Process: Mending the Loophole A lasting peace from the conflict in Northern Uganda is seen as the missing puzzle piece in the quest for national reconciliation in Uganda. Several research undertakings on reconciliation including the recent one by Makerere M.A. Peace and Conflict Studies on behalf the Coalition for National Reconciliation in Uganda (CONAR - U) continue to reveal that there is a need for national reconciliation in order to restore the societal moral and social fabrics that have been dented and fractured by the past. This should include among others participation and inclusivity, nation building, equal opportunity for all and better life for all Ugandans irrespective of tribe, ethnicity, religion or political affiliation.

As peace talks under the rubric of the Government of Southern Sudan (GoSS) mediated by Dr Riek Machar progresses speculations and anxieties especially from those directly and indirectly affected by the situation in Northern Uganda are increasing. However, the end of the 20-year conflict is not and should not be treated as an isolated matter divorced from the national societal dynamics that resulted from the pre and post colonial endurances. It is the past that always brings a nation to the present. Hence, peace should not be interpreted to mean reconciliation. Therefore, the present situation, with its past defects, should help us pave way for the country's future based on a sustainable integrated programme for national reconciliation.

South Africa, Day of Reconciliation, Kofi Annan, Nelson Mandela, Banki Moon,  Jacques Santer, Vincent Coyle, Reconciliation Day Tour, Egypt
South Africa, Day of Reconciliation, Kofi Annan, Nelson Mandela, Banki Moon,  Jacques Santer, Vincent Coyle, Reconciliation Day Tour, Egypt
South Africa, Day of Reconciliation, Kofi Annan, Nelson Mandela, Banki Moon,  Jacques Santer, Vincent Coyle, Reconciliation Day Tour, Egypt
South Africa, Day of Reconciliation, Kofi Annan, Nelson Mandela, Banki Moon,  Jacques Santer, Vincent Coyle, Reconciliation Day Tour, Egypt
South Africa, Day of Reconciliation, Kofi Annan, Nelson Mandela, Banki Moon,  Jacques Santer, Vincent Coyle, Reconciliation Day Tour, Egypt
South Africa, Day of Reconciliation, Kofi Annan, Nelson Mandela, Banki Moon,  Jacques Santer, Vincent Coyle, Reconciliation Day Tour, Egypt
South Africa, Day of Reconciliation, Kofi Annan, Nelson Mandela, Banki Moon,  Jacques Santer, Vincent Coyle, Reconciliation Day Tour, Egypt
South Africa, Day of Reconciliation, Kofi Annan, Nelson Mandela, Banki Moon,  Jacques Santer, Vincent Coyle, Reconciliation Day Tour, Egypt

Truth

Reconciliation

Justice

Creating trust and understanding between former enemies is a supremely difficult challenge. It is, however, an essential one to address in the process of building a lasting peace. Examining the painful past, acknowledging it and understanding it, and above all transcending it together, is the best way to guarantee that it does not – and cannot – happen again.

The ending of overt violence via a peace agreement or military victory does not mean the achievement of peace. Rather, the ending of violence or a so-called ‘post-conflict’ situation provides “a new set of opportunities that can be grasped or thrown away”. The international community can play a significant role in either nurturing or undermining this fragile peace building process. The United Nations, individual states and international nongovernment organisations (INGOs), have become increasingly involved in trying to rebuild peaceful societies in the aftermath of violent conflict. The dilemmas currently being faced across Europe are only the latest in a line of learning experiences in this complex task of post-conflict peace building. In Namibia and Cambodia, for the first time, the UN launched expanded peacekeeping operations which included not only military security but the coordination of elections. In East Timor, the UN mandate broadened even further to include the establishment of a functioning government and society through comprehensive development, law and order, security and governance objectives. In both Afghanistan and Iraq, extensive reconstruction activities have also been pursued, including an emphasis on establishing security, democracy and good governance. None of these things can become a reality without Truth, Justice and Awareness of Reconciliation.

Nonviolence is a philosophy, an existing theory and a practice, a lifestyle, and a means of social, political and economic struggle as old as history itself. From ancient times to the present times, people have renounced violence as a means of resolving disputes. They have opted instead for negotiation, mediation and reconciliation, thereby resisting violence with a militant and uncompromising nonviolence and respect for the integrity of all human beings, friends and enemies alike. Nonviolence provides us with tools, the positive means to oppose and stop wars and preparations for war, to resist violence, to struggle against racial, sexual and economic oppression and discrimination and to seek social justice and genuine democracy for people throughout the world. In a very real sense, nonviolence is the leaven for the bread that is a new society freed from oppression and bloodshed, a world in which persons can fulfill their individual potentials to the fullest.

Lets all come together to help reconciailation become more of a reality in all our lifes, through social and financial inclusion, in the everlasting pursuit of truth with justice for all. Everyday they are people that need help to reconcile with there past, with family and friends. Countries that need support with helping out there citizens during the war of the middle east and countries worldwide. These are all things that can be prevented and helped through reconciliation with truth and justice.