Tour - India

he number of poor people in India, according to the country’s Eleventh National Development Plan, amounts to more than 300 million. The country has been successful in reducing the proportion of poor people from about 55 per cent in 1973 to about 27 per cent in 2004. But almost one third of the country’s population of more than 1.1 billion continues to live below the poverty line, and a large proportion of poor people live in rural areas. Poverty remains a chronic condition for almost 30 per cent of India’s rural population. The incidence of rural poverty has declined somewhat over the past three decades as a result of rural to urban migration. Poverty is deepest among members of scheduled castes and tribes in the country's rural areas. In 2005 these groups accounted for 80 per cent of poor rural people, although their share in the total rural population is much smaller. On the map of poverty in India, the poorest areas are in parts of Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, Jharkhand, Orissa, Chhattisgarh and West Bengal. Large numbers of India's poorest people live in the country's semi-arid tropical region. In this area shortages of water and recurrent droughts impede the transformation of agriculture that the Green Revolution has achieved elsewhere. There is also a high incidence of poverty in flood-prone areas such as those extending from eastern Uttar Pradesh to the Assam plains, and especially in northern Bihar.
Poverty affects tribal people in forest areas, where loss of entitlement to resources has made them even poorer. In coastal fishing communities people's living conditions are deteriorating because of environmental degradation, stock depletion and vulnerability to natural disasters. A major cause of poverty among India’s rural people, both individuals and communities, is lack of access to productive assets and financial resources. High levels of illiteracy, inadequate health care and extremely limited access to social services are common among poor rural people. Microenterprise development, which could generate income and enable poor people to improve their living conditions, has only recently become a focus of the government. Women in general are the most disadvantaged people in Indian society, though their status varies significantly according to their social and ethnic backgrounds. Women are particularly vulnerable to the spread of HIV/AIDS from urban to rural areas. In 2005 an estimated 5.7 million men, women and children in India were living with HIV/AIDS. Most of them are in the 15-49 age group and almost 40 per cent of them, or 2.4 million in 2008, are women (National AIDS Control Organisation).


South Africa, Day of Reconciliation, Kofi Annan, Nelson Mandela, Banki Moon,  Jacques Santer, Rural Poverty India, Vincent Coyle, Reconciliation Day, India, Tour
South Africa, Day of Reconciliation, Kofi Annan, Nelson Mandela, Banki Moon,  Jacques Santer, Vincent Coyle, Reconciliation Day Tour, India
South Africa, Day of Reconciliation, Kofi Annan, Nelson Mandela, Banki Moon,  Jacques Santer, Vincent Coyle, Reconciliation Day Tour, India
South Africa, Day of Reconciliation, Kofi Annan, Nelson Mandela, Banki Moon,  Jacques Santer, Vincent Coyle, Reconciliation Day Tour, India
South Africa, Day of Reconciliation, Kofi Annan, Nelson Mandela, Banki Moon,  Jacques Santer, Vincent Coyle, Reconciliation Day Tour, India
South Africa, Day of Reconciliation, Kofi Annan, Nelson Mandela, Banki Moon,  Jacques Santer, Vincent Coyle, Reconciliation Day Tour, India
South Africa, Day of Reconciliation, Kofi Annan, Nelson Mandela, Banki Moon,  Jacques Santer, Vincent Coyle, Reconciliation Day Tour, India
South Africa, Day of Reconciliation, Kofi Annan, Nelson Mandela, Banki Moon,  Jacques Santer, Vincent Coyle, Reconciliation Day Tour, India
South Africa, Day of Reconciliation, Kofi Annan, Nelson Mandela, Banki Moon,  Jacques Santer, Vincent Coyle, Reconciliation Day Tour, India
South Africa, Day of Reconciliation, Kofi Annan, Nelson Mandela, Banki Moon,  Jacques Santer, Vincent Coyle, Reconciliation Day Tour, India
South Africa, Day of Reconciliation, Kofi Annan, Nelson Mandela, Banki Moon,  Jacques Santer, Vincent Coyle, Reconciliation Day Tour, India
South Africa, Day of Reconciliation, Kofi Annan, Nelson Mandela, Banki Moon,  Jacques Santer, Vincent Coyle, Reconciliation Day Tour, India
South Africa, Day of Reconciliation, Kofi Annan, Nelson Mandela, Banki Moon,  Jacques Santer, Vincent Coyle, Reconciliation Day Tour, India
South Africa, Day of Reconciliation, Kofi Annan, Nelson Mandela, Banki Moon,  Jacques Santer, Vincent Coyle, Reconciliation Day Tour, India
South Africa, Day of Reconciliation, Kofi Annan, Nelson Mandela, Banki Moon,  Jacques Santer, Vincent Coyle, Reconciliation Day Tour, India
South Africa, Day of Reconciliation, Kofi Annan, Nelson Mandela, Banki Moon,  Jacques Santer, Vincent Coyle, Reconciliation Day Tour, India
South Africa, Day of Reconciliation, Kofi Annan, Nelson Mandela, Banki Moon,  Jacques Santer, Vincent Coyle, Reconciliation Day Tour, India
South Africa, Day of Reconciliation, Kofi Annan, Nelson Mandela, Banki Moon,  Jacques Santer, Vincent Coyle, Reconciliation Day Tour, India
South Africa, Day of Reconciliation, Kofi Annan, Nelson Mandela, Banki Moon,  Jacques Santer, Vincent Coyle, Reconciliation Day Tour, India
South Africa, Day of Reconciliation, Kofi Annan, Nelson Mandela, Banki Moon,  Jacques Santer, Vincent Coyle, Reconciliation Day Tour, India
South Africa, Day of Reconciliation, Kofi Annan, Nelson Mandela, Banki Moon,  Jacques Santer, Vincent Coyle, Reconciliation Day Tour, India

Truth

Reconciliation

Justice

Creating trust and understanding between former enemies is a supremely difficult challenge. It is, however, an essential one to address in the process of building a lasting peace. Examining the painful past, acknowledging it and understanding it, and above all transcending it together, is the best way to guarantee that it does not – and cannot – happen again.

The ending of overt violence via a peace agreement or military victory does not mean the achievement of peace. Rather, the ending of violence or a so-called ‘post-conflict’ situation provides “a new set of opportunities that can be grasped or thrown away”. The international community can play a significant role in either nurturing or undermining this fragile peace building process. The United Nations, individual states and international nongovernment organisations (INGOs), have become increasingly involved in trying to rebuild peaceful societies in the aftermath of violent conflict. The dilemmas currently being faced across Europe are only the latest in a line of learning experiences in this complex task of post-conflict peace building. In Namibia and Cambodia, for the first time, the UN launched expanded peacekeeping operations which included not only military security but the coordination of elections. In East Timor, the UN mandate broadened even further to include the establishment of a functioning government and society through comprehensive development, law and order, security and governance objectives. In both Afghanistan and Iraq, extensive reconstruction activities have also been pursued, including an emphasis on establishing security, democracy and good governance. None of these things can become a reality without Truth, Justice and Awareness of Reconciliation.

Nonviolence is a philosophy, an existing theory and a practice, a lifestyle, and a means of social, political and economic struggle as old as history itself. From ancient times to the present times, people have renounced violence as a means of resolving disputes. They have opted instead for negotiation, mediation and reconciliation, thereby resisting violence with a militant and uncompromising nonviolence and respect for the integrity of all human beings, friends and enemies alike. Nonviolence provides us with tools, the positive means to oppose and stop wars and preparations for war, to resist violence, to struggle against racial, sexual and economic oppression and discrimination and to seek social justice and genuine democracy for people throughout the world. In a very real sense, nonviolence is the leaven for the bread that is a new society freed from oppression and bloodshed, a world in which persons can fulfill their individual potentials to the fullest.

Lets all come together to help reconciailation become more of a reality in all our lifes, through social and financial inclusion, in the everlasting pursuit of truth with justice for all. Everyday they are people that need help to reconcile with there past, with family and friends. Countries that need support with helping out there citizens during the war of the middle east and countries worldwide. These are all things that can be prevented and helped through reconciliation with truth and justice.